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The redesign of health and social care in Trafford gets underway

Doctors, nurses, social care professionals, patients and health managers came together last week to start the process of redesigning health and social care services in Trafford.

More than 40 participants, from a wide variety of clinical areas from across the borough, shared their views on how to address the pressures facing local services, over two dedicated clinical planning days.

This redesign work to create a new health deal for Trafford is essential to secure local health and social care services for the future.

As Dr Nigel Guest, a Trafford GP and the chair of Trafford's emerging clinical commissioning group, commented: "The challenges we face in Trafford are considerable, with significant health inequalities and a hospital service that is currently unaffordable.  If we are to develop effective plans for better ways to do things in the future, we need to ensure that we take full account of the views of doctors, nurses and other clinical staff."

The redesign work is being led by an overarching three point vision to provide:

  • Right care, right time, right place - So services are closer to patients, joined up and easier to access
  • Cost effective services - So services are financially sound for the next 60 years of the NHS
  • Highest standards of care - So patients receive the best quality and experience with their care

The vision aims to ensure that there continues to be a range of safe and sustainable hospital services in Trafford, to develop integrated pathways of care to enable more people to be treated closer to home, and to improve quality and ultimately outcomes for patients.

"The positive joint working between all of the key partner organisations in Trafford is extremely encouraging", said Dr George Kissen, a Trafford GP and medical director at NHS Trafford.  "The senior clinical staff involved in the planning days come from a variety of different services and specialties, and they have now undertaken some very productive work on discussing the future of health service provision in Trafford.  They have looked at all the key issues and have started to consider how these can be addressed to ensure we can continue to provide high quality, accessible and sustainable services for the population of Trafford in the longer term.  Maintaining this co-operative and collaborative working will be essential to developing and implementing effective plans for the future."

These clinical discussions follow a series of listening events that took place with members of the public is areas across Trafford to find out about what their ideal patient experience would look like, and also to gather their priorities for how the services should be arranged in the future.

Ann Day, chair of Trafford Local Involvement Network (LINk), who attended the clinical events and many of the public events, added: "The listening events that have taken place with clinicians, NHS managers, patients and the public, and other important stakeholders are just the start of an ongoing process to continually talk to Trafford residents about the potential service models being designed by clinicians."

There will be many opportunities for people to get involved in shaping the new health deal in Trafford, such as by attending events, focus groups and local meetings, responding to surveys or simply by getting in touch.

Join the conversation by visiting the dedicated website www.healthdeal.trafford.nhs.uk, emailing newhealthdeal@trafford.nhs.uk, following the twitter feed @newhealthdeal, or liking the facebook page www.facebook.com/newhealthdeal.