Ambreen's Story

Hi, my name is Ambreen Yasin. Last year I was told that I was at risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes. I was so shocked and was determined to prevent myself from getting Diabetes. I was given so much information and was told the "how's'" and "whys'" of diabetes.

I was offered the opportunity to take part in a clinical trial, with the Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Facility. The trial lasted about 6 months, I was really nervous and had no idea what to expect. Surprisingly, my first meeting went so well I couldn't wait to come back! I was introduced to two Paediatric Nurses, Kathryn McBride and Vicky Parker both of whom are the reason why this experience was so enjoyable. They were very friendly, funny and were comfortable to talk to. They explained what would be happening throughout the day and they put up with my endless list of questions with incredible patience! We went through the basics and I was measured and had a few (pain free!) tests taken. I then had a cannula inserted so they could take blood from me from one place instead of poking several holes into me! I was checked once every hour for about three hours. It sounds quite long but the nurses kept me company so I was never bored.

Another part of the trial as that I was asked to take a pill three times a day at home. So for 6 months I took a pill not knowing if it was Metformin or placebo which was basically just sugar and water! I felt quite lucky. Not much effort was required on my part!

I felt quite proud for taking part in something that hopefully would bring new information and would possibly change many lives. I discovered a whole new side to science and medicine and realised how important the trials were.

I would encourage anyone to take part in a clinical trial, if possible, for the experience, for the chance to be part of such amazing work and also because even if it doesn't benefit you it may benefit someone else.

 

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"I felt quite proud for taking part in something that hopefully would bring new information and would possibly change many lives."